Support Payments Redux

So you’ve split up with your significant other, and you’re forced to make support payments. The first thing you’ll be asking me is, “are they deductible?” Well, just like your relationship, it’s complicated. That’s what The Tax Issue is here for.

There are two basic requirements before you even consider taking a deduction. First, the payments must be based on a written agreement or a court order. Second, they must be periodic payments. Lump sums or payments based on a mutual, non written understanding are not deductible.

Once you’ve passed these hurdles the rules are different depending on when your agreement or court order was signed. We’ll tackle them one at a time, but before we do, you should be aware of one more thing: any amount that is deductible to the payer is also taxable to recipient.

Written Agreement or Court Order After April 1997

If your document is dated after April, 1997, only payments made in support of your spouse (or common law partner) are deductible. Child support is not.

Your agreement must clearly specify which payments are exclusively for spousal support. If no mention is made of the purpose of the payments, they are deemed to be for child support and are not deductible.

Payments made to a third party qualify as long as they are for the benefit of your spouse and he or she has control over them. For example, if a court order specifies that payments are to be made to a landlord for your spouse’s rent, it must also be made clear that your spouse may at any time have those payments made to her instead if he or she so desires.

If you qualify for a deduction under the above rules, you must register your agreement or court order with the CRA by filing form T1158.

Written Agreement or Court Order After April 1997

If your document is dated prior to May, 1997, then payments for spousal support and child support are deductible.

However, if the agreement was amended after April, 1997 and the amount of child support payments is modified, then you fall into the new rules, and they will no longer be deductible.

You can also choose, if your spouse agrees, to have the new rules apply to make the payments non-deductible (and non-taxable to the recipient) by filing an election on Form T1157.

Those are the basic rules. If you need more information, try the CRA guide P102. That should answer most of your questions.

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